Zack Loucks

Zack Loucks

Work History

Work History
Jan 2004 - Present

Industrial Designer

Rogers Athletic / StageRight


  • In the 8+ years I have worked with Rogers Athletic, I have designed or significantly updated nearly 40 products that are currently in production.  This does not include StageRight products, or products designed for outside companies, which would add a few more. 
  • I enjoy being able to find myself on a Google Patent Search.
  • The company is more respectful and aware of design's importance than it was when I started.  Feedback from coaches on the weight machines like "Finally, something that looks good - I can recruit with this!" have shown what effect design can have on a product.
  • I led the design language of the Pendulum weight equipment, which was an interesting study on redesigning an existing product around set parameters, and difficult to portray the necessary emotion while keeping in line with our manufacturing capabilities.  The Pendulum design language has struck a chord with coaches because of the reaction these machines get when new recruits see them.  I never tire of seeing people get excited over something I've helped to create.

Lessons learned:

  • Making something ugly usually costs about as much as making something beautiful.
  • A design that communicates some emotion tends to be treated better throughout the production process.  Even shop workers who before tended to "fix" everything with a hammer can be careful and even protective of the assembly of a product they're proud of.
  • More design & engineering time usually equates to less time fixing expensive mistakes.
  • Respect for others' jobs and schedules tends to get things done quicker.
Sep 1999 - Jul 2003

Bike Mechanic / Sales

Copelands Sports


  • Held 22-30 hour week while attending BYU full time.
  • During my time there we became the highest selling Cannondale dealer in the world (which I believe was actually Copelands as a chain, and we were the highest selling store of the chain)
  • Built a reputation for truing wheels and consequently got many challenges from riders who were told by other bike shops that their wheel could not be straightened.
  • By investigating first what customers wanted and then presenting the possible solutions, I made a lot of sales by referral and having people come back later because they didn't like the other salesmen.  (In hind sight I can see this was a result of design-thinking.  Truly defining a problem before setting about a solution.)

Lessons learned:

  • Focusing on consumers' wants gave me insights for both sales and design problems.  For instance, a lot of high end & lightweight products just didn't last very long for a normal user who didn't pay much attention to maintenance.  It often required special tools to work on also which meant their bike spent more time in the shop.
  • Some products really solve a problem, others are just gimmicks.  The trick is to produce the first kind.



Trade Smart University

More Technical Analysis.  This is what I really get into.  Trade Smart U is so far the most down to earth educator I have found for technical analysis.  They truly don't care which way the market moves and are willing to wait until it does when it's sideways.  My most valuable lessons from TSU have been learning to draw correct support and resistance lines, and trend lines.

Coupling this knowledge, with the risk analysis and trade management I learned from Technitrader, has bumped up my confidence significantly in reading the market trends.  My bank account is happier too.


All my life I have been interested in investing but haven't had a mentor to learn from.  At least not a successful one.  TT's ME10 course was a comprehensive educational experience that taught me several things:

  • Market Condition - how to identify what type of market we are in, and what strategies to use during that condition.
  • Fundamental Analysis - I call this the "WHAT to buy" information.  Investigating the financial condition of a company, their history, where they are in their business cycle, etc.
  • Technical Analysis - I call this the "WHEN to buy" information.  This is also where I turn into a real dork, because I can stare at stock charts all day long if you let me.  What I pulled away most from Technitrader is how to use certain indicators, especially leading indicators, which help forecast a stock's behavior.
  • Risk Analysis & Trade Management - This is how not to lose money.  Buy controlling your risk at the point of entry, and managing that risk throughout the trade.
Apr 1998 - Jun 2003


Brigham Young University

Emphasis was on transportation, but the more I got involved in design the more I gravitated to product design for the research and variety of problems to solve.


  • BFA degree
  • Sponsored projects from Ford, GM and Honda, each with its own challenge and method of presentation.
  • VP of Honda Design actually used my project in a presentation to the company on what schools to use as alternatives to Art Center and other "usuals".
  • Building of the XDub, a VW Beetle based Corvette concept which was a weird combination, but a fun learning experience in fiberglass.
  • SAE club member

Lessons learned:

  • Sketching for yourself is about discovery.  Sketching for someone else is about communication.
  • To be properly evaluated, a design really needs to be viewed in 2D, 3D and preferably in reality.
  • One person doesn't always have the best ideas, but a team usually will.