Telsa Graham

Telsa Graham

Skills

Skills

Charge/Service Nurse

Surgical

Oncology

Medical-Surgery

My Nursing Philosophy

My philosophy of Oncology Nursing is that of caring, compassion, devotion, and dedication to those patients who are receiving cancer treatments and care. Also to celebrate survivor-ship with those who are on the cancer journey. I envision oncology nursing to have every nurse who work with oncology patients train and certified in chemotherapy/immunotherapy/biotherapy administration; and that each nurse becomes oncology certified.

More trained chemotherapy/biotherapy/immunotherapy administration nurses decreases the chances of chemotherapy medication administration errors. Patients are able to receive the chemotherapy/biotherapy in a timely manner; patients are monitored closely for hypersensitivity and adverse reactions to the drugs; and patients given timely treatment for hypersensitivity or adverse reactions to the drugs. The caveat of such an increase in providers amounts to efficiency, patient safety and quality patient outcomes.

I have transitioned from an oncology inpatient setting to an oncology outpatient clinic of the hospital. I continue to certify the inpatient nurse providers in the practicum portion of the course. This innovation has improved patients' satisfaction, increased chemotherapy providers and inspired more nurses to become oncology certified nurses. My goal is to have nurses and oncology providers, oncologists, nurse practitioners and physician assistants work in collaboration for the best quality and safe health care provided to the veterans.

Honors, Awards

  • 2012 - Nurse of the Year, Oncology (Award Winner); March of Dimes, Georgia Chapter
  • 2012 - Nurse of the Year, Oncology (Award Finalist); March of Dimes
  • 2007 - Nurse of the Year (Award Winner); Georgia Nurses Association
  • 2005 - Nurse of the Year (Award Winner); Atlanta VA Medical Center, Georgia Nursing Association
  • 1998 - Induction; Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing
  • 1998 - Dean’s List; Brenau University, Gainesville, GA
  • 1984 - Dean’s List; New York City College of Technology, Brooklyn, New York, NY

Consulting, Presentation, Community Activities

What is Cancer: the different types of cancer, prevention and treatment.

04/2007 - Present, Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, GA

Description:  Nurse educator supporting the inpatient oncology nurses on cancer care and administration of cytotoxic drugs.

Accomplishments:  Nurses are able to understand the reasons for administration of certain types of chemotherapy/biotherapy/immunotherapy to patients diagnosed with a certain type of cancer, e.g. Colorectal cancer being treated with targeted therapy/chemotherapy/immunotherapy.

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Lecture: Breast Cancer (# 2)

10/2012, Hapeville Charter Career Academy, Atlanta, GA

Forum: Use of Power Point to lecture to high school children.

Abstract: No Abstract.  I was an invited guest speaker of Hapeville Charter Career Academy of Atlanta Georgia during Breast Cancer awareness month.  This is a PowerPoint presentation used to teach high school students during breast cancer awareness month.  I taught five classes different periods of the day a total of one hundred and more students.

Description: I was consulted by the high school science teacher to be the Teacher of the day.  As the teacher of the day I taught and discussed with five classes of high school children about breast cancer, risk factors, diagnosed, stages, treatment and prevention.  Each session was 55 minutes.  It was an interactive program.  Students were allowed to ask questions, find breast lumps in breast moles.  At the end of each discussion students were given pamphlets that had information on breast cancer.  Also, students were encouraged to do breast self-examinations each month.  They were taught how to do the examination by looking at live videos.  Additionally, students were encouraged to share the information with their friends, loved ones and parents.  The closing remarks were: breast cancer does not choose people, at any age post puberty.  You can be diagnosed with breast cancer.  Breast cancer can be hereditary.

Accomplishments:  Students demonstrated learning: they were very receptive and asked very important questions such as: do men get breast cancer; and how is breast cancer diagnosed and treated?  Students shared information of mothers who were diagnosed with breast cancer and are survivors; and mothers who are going through chemotherapy and radiation therapy.  These students shared their experiences of the coping skills they used to accept and support their mothers along their cancer journeys.

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When Cancer causes Abdominal Mischief

08/14/2012, Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, GA, Room 321

Forum: PowerPoint Presentation at Grand Rounds.

Abstract: No Abstract. I presented the topic information with coworkers, Rita Walker, RN and Deborah Thompson, RN.

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Community Health Fair

07/21/2012 - 07/21/2012, Health Fair Participant

Teaching people in the community on:

  • Breast Cancer
  • Prostate Cancer
  • Multiple Myeloma
  • Importance of taking the Flu Vaccine and Pneumonia Vaccine

People in the community were very happy for the information on breast cancer, prostate cancer, multiple myeloma and having the blood pressure checked and what to do if elevated. Also we gave out free voucher for flu vaccines.

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Blood Pressure Screening and Diabetic Screening

07/2012, Paradise Missionary Baptist Ministry, Inc. Health Fair, Atlanta, GA

Several people were referred to their primary care physician for follow-up care. Those who did not have a primary care physician were referred to the community health centers.

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Iowa Model of Research Practice

04/21/2012, On-line

Forum:  Online Presentation to Class NUR736

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Multifaceted Approaches Achieve Transformational Leadership Success

01/04/2012, Grapevine, TX

Forum: Biennial Convention

Abstract: (41st Biennial Convention) Background: Within large bureaucratic organizations transformational leadership requires innovative approaches to meet the needs of the staff members as well as the mission, vision and strategic goals of the organization. The effective Nurse Leader employs multiple interventions to achieve staff satisfaction and unit cohesion to support nurse retention and patient satisfaction. In an outpatient care setting staff interactions were not consistent with the vision of the organization. Objectives: Transform the Hematology/Oncology Infusion center to a more caring and enjoyable environment evidenced by: improved RN to RN interactions improve RN to MD interactions and improved teamwork between co-workers. Methods: The project utilized interventions for quality improvement outcomes. For a period of eighteen months (February 2009 - August 2010) interventions were implemented with nursing and physician staff of a Hematology/Oncology Infusion center. Nursing staff presented in-services on the Forces of Magnetism. Discussions of the practical application of Dr. Jean Watson's theory of Human Caring in the clinical setting and Caritas Literacy Skills development were completed. Staffs were held accountable for their behavior. Data analysis: Data from the National Data Base of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) for the unit were compared from 2009 to 2010. Results: Demonstrated increased scores in all areas ranging from 1.90 % to 11.25 %; RN to RN interactions 7.37%, RN to MD 1.9%, Job enjoyment 8.75%, decision making 11.25%, teamwork between co-workers 8.97%, and view of nursing management 5.75%. Based on the T-scores, all scores met high satisfaction criteria. Conclusion/Nursing Implications: Data from the National Data Base of Nursing Quality Indicators is a valuable tool to evaluate and monitor the achievement of nursing leadership objectives. The methods employed significantly contributed to positive outcomes. An inference of correlation can be made to patient satisfaction based on the literature. http://hdl.handle.net/10755/201829 Co-authors: LaGaunda C. Jones, MS, AFMP and Rita D. Walker RN, BSN, MSHA.

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Patient Aligned Patient Care Team (PACT)

11/30/2011, On-line 522

Forum:  Power-Point Presentation to College Students

Abstract: No Abstract.

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Lecture: Breast Cancer (# 1)

11/08/2011, Westwood College, School of Healthcare, Atlanta, GA

Forum: Lecture

Abstract: PowerPoint presentation on Breast Cancer to College students.  The Invitation was given to me by the faculty during home coming.

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EUTHANASIA

10/24/2011, On-line, NUR 740, Fall Semester

Forum: EUTHANASIA

Abstract: No Abstract

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Palliative Care Education

10/17/2011, Orlando, FL

Forum: International Nursing Research Congress

Abstract: 21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation]

Purpose: It is estimated by the year 2030, one of five Americans will be 65 or older, and the number of people over the age of 85 will double. These statistics reveal a need to implement evidence base palliative care educational program.

Design and Method: n=33 (28) Registered Nurses, (3) Advance Practice Nurses, and (2) Licensed Practical Nurses attended the program at the Medical Center. Rosswurm and Larrabees's change model were utilized for understanding health care quality as related to Evidence-Based practice and change in the clinical setting. End-of Life Nursing Education Consortium Curriculum (ELNEC) eight modules were presented in the form of power point, discussions, video, case studies, and role play.

Measurement: Pre-Post test questionnaires; anonymous and confidential. Twenty items of the Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses measured areas of philosophy and principles of palliative care, pain and symptom management, and psychosocial aspect of care. Response choices were true or false and don't know. Total scores range from 0-20. Total time frame for the quiz was approximately 20 minutes.

Results: Pre-Test scores indicated that 86% (25) of the nurses had no formal education in palliative care. 58% (8) nurses had at least 10 years of experience in various nursing departments. Overall, pre-training knowledge strength was 70%. Post Training strength changed to 82%. Overall, post training increase strength was 14%. Conclusion: There is a significant need for palliative care education programs for nurses and all healthcare practitioners in any settings.

References: American Association of College of Nursing. About ELNEC (2004). Retrieved August 20, 2008 from htpp://www.aacn.nche.edu/elnec/about.htm. Rosswurm, M. A. & Larrabee, J.H. (1999). A model for change to Evidence-Based practice. Image: Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 31, 317-322.Ross, M. M., McDonald, B., & McGuinness, J. (1996). The Palliative care quiz for nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing. http://hdl.handle.net/10755/1 Co-authors: Mompoint, Marie, RN, DNP, FNP-C, OCN, HPCN; Veronica Reynolds, RN, MSN; Linda Parker, MSN, Clinical, Nurse, Specialist; Sun'ja Watson, BSN.

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Global Compressed Pay

07/02/2011, On-line

Forum: Power Point presentation

Abstract: No Abstract.  Presented with group members.

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Hug Therapy

09/14/2010, Minneapolis, MN

Forum: Presented to nurse peers at Pain Management Nursing Conference

Abstract:

PURPOSE

To communicate the value of hug therapy, a complementary alternative pain measure, and to accentuate the value of nurses' caring arms, hands, and fingers that administer cytotoxic medications as having the power to give and receive comfort, thus reducing the psychological pains of stress/tension caused by cancer diagnoses

DESIGN

Patients/nurses use and adhere to the Rules and Ethics of Hugging for Health. Patients/nurses giving compassionate not passionate hugs seek permission before hugging or when a hug is needed.

Patients/nurses give hugs using A-frame or side-to-side hugs.

Patients/nurses answer questionnaires listing their perceptions of hug therapy.

RESULTS

Three-, 6-, and 12-month feedbacks from patients/staff provided positive indicators that hugging:

1. Dispels fear and eases tension.

2. Is a universal medicine-helps with pain management.

3. When given, gets you one immediately in return.

4. Makes arms smile and laugh, relieving the pains of stress and tension.

DISCUSSION

This poster emphasizes that hugging is healthy and natural. It is an alternative pain-relieving measure that can be used and incorporated with traditional medication for pain management to maximize the efficacy of pain medication. Its therapeutic touch is a ''basic healing need and more vital than medication'' (Helen Colton). It not only invigorates but also rejuvenates the body. It is comforting to those with physical

and psychosocial pains of stress and tension

Abstracts: Pain Management Nursing, Vol 12, No 2 (June), 2011: pp 1-11

http://www.painmanagementnursing.org/article/S1524-9042(10)00151-7/abstract. Co-authors: Rita Walker, BSN, MSHCA, RN; Deborah Thompson, BSN, RN, OCN; Linda Carriel, BSN, RN; Carol Mackey, BSN, RN, OCN; Doris Horton, BSN, RN, OCN,CMC; Elaine Hudson, BSN, RN, HPCC.

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Value of Hug Therapy: Oncology Nurses and Patients with Cancer in a Hematology/Oncology Outpatient Clinic

09/08/2010, Minneapolis, MN

Forum: Display of Poster and answering questions.

Abstract:

PURPOSE

To communicate the value of hug therapy, a complementary alternative pain measure, and to accentuate the value of nurses' caring arms, hands, and fingers that administer cytotoxic medications as having the power to give and receive comfort, thus reducing the psychological pains of stress/tension caused by cancer diagnoses

DESIGN

Patients/nurses use and adhere to the Rules and Ethics of Hugging for Health. Patients/nurses giving compassionate not passionate hugs seek permission before hugging or when a hug is needed.

Patients/nurses give hugs using A-frame or side-to-side hugs.

Patients/nurses answer questionnaires listing their perceptions of hug therapy.

RESULTS

Three-, 6-, and 12-month feedbacks from patients/staff provided positive indicators that hugging:

1. Dispels fear and eases tension.

2. Is a universal medicine-helps with pain management.

3. When given, gets you one immediately in return.

4. Makes arms smile and laugh, relieving the pains of stress and tension.

DISCUSSION

This poster emphasizes that hugging is healthy and natural. It is an alternative pain-relieving measure that can be used and incorporated with traditional medication for pain management to maximize the efficacy of pain medication. Its therapeutic touch is a ''basic healing need and more vital than medication'' (Helen Colton). It not only invigorates but also rejuvenates the body. It is comforting to those with physical and psychosocial pains of stress and tension.

Abstracts: Pain Management Nursing, Vol 12, No 2 (June), 2011: pp 1-11 http://www.painmanagementnursing.org/article/S1524-9042(10)00151-7/abstract. Co-authors: Rita Walker RN, Elaine Hudson RN, Doris Horton RN, Linda Carriel RN, Carol Mackey RN, Deborah Thompson RN LaGaunda Jones.

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Continuing Education

  • 12/11/2012, Personal Leadership, Credit Hours: 2, Contact Hours: 2
  • 11/14/2012, Leading People, Credit Hours: 2, Contact Hours: 2
  • 10/18/2012, Becoming a Results Oriented Leader, Credit Hours: 2, Contact Hours: 2
  • 09/19/2012, Strategic Thinking, Credit Hours: 2, Contact Hours: 2
  • 08/29/2012, Pressure Ulcer, Credit Hours: 1.5, Contact Hours: 1.5
  • 07/28/2012, Joslin Diabetes Forum 2012, Credit Hours: 6, Contact Hours: 6
  • 09/08/2011, ASPMN 21st Pain Management National Conference, Credit Hours: 16.5, Contact Hours: 16.5
  • 05/12/2011, Leadership Pathway for Emerging Leaders, Credit Hours: 0.5, Contact Hours: 0
  • 10/14/2010, Leadership Development Institute, Credit Hours: 18.2, Contact Hours: 18.2
  • 09/22/2010, ASPMN 20th Pain Management Conference, Credit Hours: 18, Contact Hours: 18
  • 08/02/2010, Culturally Competent Nursing Care: A Cornerstone of Caring, Credit Hours: 9, Contact Hours: 9
  • 07/12/2010, Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Research Congress, Global Diversity through Research, Education and Evidence-based Practice, Credit Hours: 22.25, Contact Hours: 22.25
  • 03/30/2010, End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium, Credit Hours: 10.75, Contact Hours: 10.75

Review and Research Activities

Oncology Nursing Society: Abstracts Review

3/1/2010, Manuscript: Review of abstracts for either poster/podium or both presentations at the 32nd Oncology nursing Conference.

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Nurses Perception of autonomy

DNP capstone project: An online questionnaire to measure nurses perception of autonomy.

This study is a quality improvement project. It measured nurses' perception of autonomy, authority and accountability. These nurses work in a shared governance environment in a magnet institution. The survey tool used is a autonomy, authority and accountability survey questionnaire by Mary Belgen PhD, RN and a demographic survey by Kathleen Blanch PhD, RN.

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Multifaceted Approaches Achieve Transformational Leadership Success

A project aimed at developing better collaboration among nurses, oncologists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and administrative clerks in an outpatient hematology/oncology clinic.

Seminars: Team Building, Leadership, Communication, Negativism in the workplace and Change: Fostering a new Attitude.

Comparison of 2009 NDNQI results with 2010 NDNQI

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Work History

Work History
Oct 2012 - Present

Charge Nurse, Hematology/Oncology Outpatient Clinic

Atlanta VA Medical Center
Oct 2009 - Oct 2012

Staff Nurse, Hematology/Oncology Outpatient Clinic

Atlanta VA Medical Center
Sep 2004 - Sep 2009

Charge Nurse, Day Shift, Medical/Oncology

Atlanta VA Medical Center
Sep 1989 - Sep 2004

Charge Nurse, Night Shift, Medical/Oncology

Atlanta VA Medical Center
Sep 1986 - Sep 1988

Staff Nurse, Medical/Surgical/Gynecology Unit

Saint Mary's Hospital

Education

Education
Jan 2010 - Present

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

The University of Alabama
Dec 2011 - Present

Master of Science

Clarkson College
May 1999 - Present

Bachelor of Science

Brenau University
Jun 1998 - Present

Bachelor of Science

Saint Joseph's College of Maine
Jun 1986 - Present

Associate of Applied Science

New York City College of Technology

Certifications

Certifications
2008 - 2017

Pain Management Registered Nurse-Board Certified, (RN-BC)

American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)
1997 - 2017

Medical-Surgical Nurse-Board Certified (RN-BC)

American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC)
1999 - 2015

Oncology Certified Nurse (OCN)

Oncology Nursing Society (ONS)
2006 - 2015

Chemotherapy/Biotherapy Administration

Oncology Nursing Society (ONS)
2006 - 2014

Chemotherapy & Biotherapy Trainer

Oncology Nursing Society (ONS)
1986 - 2014

Registered Nurse

State of New York
1988 - 2014

Registered Nurse

State of Georgia