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Education

Sep 2010Present

Doctor of Philosophy

University of British Columbia

  • Title of proposed research: Spectroscopic Methods for Structural and Compositional Analysis of Biological Molecules
  • Teaching Assistant: Fall 2010/Winter 2011 - 1st-year undergraduate chemistry labs, Fall 2011/Winter 2012 - 3rd/4th-year undergraduate analytical chemistry labs. 
Sep 2007Sep 2009

Master of Science

Memorial University of Newfoundland
  • Title of Master's thesis: “Probing the Structures of Protonated and Metalated Glycine Complexes Using Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy,” which was done under the supervision of Travis D. Fridgen.
  • Completed three graduate level courses: Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Kinetics & Dynamics, and Photochemistry of Transition Metal Complexes. 
  • Teaching Assistant: 1st year undergraduate chemistry courses. Fall 2007/2008 semesters - responsible for developing and presenting mid-term tutorial sessions, individually marked mid-terms. Winter 2008/2009 semesters - in-lab instruction 
Sep 2002Apr 2007

Bachelor of Science, Honours Co-op

University of Waterloo
  • Undergraduate Honour's thesis: “Investigating the Structural and Energetic Properties of Deprotonated Glycine···ROH (R = H, CH3, C2H5) in the Gas Phase,” which was done under the supervision of Terry B. McMahon.
  • Five year undergraduate co-operative degree, which required the successful completion of four work terms. 

Work History

May 2007Aug 2007

NSERC Undergraduate Student Research Award position

University of Waterloo
  • As a recipient of the NSERC Undergraduate Student Research Award, I was given the opportunity to complete the mass spectrometry research started during my undergraduate honours project. 
  • The experience allowed me to present my results at a relevant conference, which led to the publication of a refereed journal article (see publication #2).
May 2006Aug 2006

Research Assistant (Co-op)

Natural Resources Canada

  • This was my final co-op term and my first experience working for the government. 
  • I was responsible for continuing and completing a contracted project which involved using ion exchange chromatography to optimize the removal of base metal impurities from industrial copper electrolyte. 
  • I was the sole occupant of the assigned laboratory space and therefore worked independently.
May 2005Aug 2005

Medicinal Chemist (Intern)

Amgen
  • Working in a pharmaceutical environment, the project team I was connected with was actively seeking a novel compound targeting a specific receptor. 
  • I was responsible for synthesizing various small molecules, analyzing cellular assay data, and deducing structural activity relationships. 
  • The major difference with a job of this nature was the constant pressure of trying to actively synthesize potential receptor inhibitors while improving upon previously proposed structures. Work was constantly reviewed and critiqued.
Sep 2004Dec 2004

Quality Assurance Technician (Co-op)

SC Johnson

  • The day-to-day responsibilities of a quality assurance laboratory technician required excellent time management skills. 
  • As orders were processed and manufactured on the plant floor, I was responsible for performing a variety of chemical tests to ensure conformance of raw materials, intermediates, and bulks for use in production. 
  • The specifications were well-defined and I needed to be aware of these in order to properly deal with and repair non-conformities.
Jan 2003Apr 2003

Laboratory Assistant (Co-op)

Maxxam Analytics

  • As a junior laboratory assistant, I was fully responsible for certain wet lab analyses (pH testing, particle size analysis, conductivity measurements, etc.). 
  • I assisted in sample receiving by dispensing samples to be stored properly according to proper ISO requirements. 
  • I was also in charge of monitoring ultra high purity gas levels and changing tanks when necessary.

References

David Kopecky

Dave was a co-worker/co-supervisor during my internship with the pharmaceutical company Amgen. His assistance was invaluable, not only in the workplace but also by introducing me to San Francisco. 

Travis Fridgen

Travis was my supervisor at Memorial University for two years. Prior to that, he was an adjunct professor at the University of Waterloo where he instructed me in a class on mass spectrometry. 

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PERSONAL SUMMARY

  • Twenty-seven year old male, Canadian citizen currently residing in Vancouver, British Columbia. 
  • I was born in St. John's and raised nearby until the age of thirteen.
  • My family relocated to Truro, Nova Scotia where I finished my public schooling (both junior and high school). It was under the tutelage of my high school science teachers where I first developed my inclination towards chemistry. 
  • When the appropriate time came, I chose to attend the University of Waterloo which was nationally recognized as the one of the best universities in Canada. After spending five years at Waterloo, I returned to Newfoundland and completed a two-year Master’s degree at Memorial University. 
  • I'm currently enrolled in a PhD program at the University of British Columbia. 
  • In creating this visual CV, I have attempted to produce a more personalized document to give the viewer better insight into my personality and hobbies. For those interested in a standard CV, there is one attached via a link in the side bar.  

PUBLICATIONS