Mark Twain

Mark Twain

Basic Information

My name is Samuel Langhorne Clemens! I was born on November 30th, 1835 in Florida, Missouri. By the age of twelve I had lost 3 siblings and my father. The death of my father in 1847 was the spark that insinuated my working career at the age of 12.

Work History

Work History
1949 - 2009

Notable Works Over the Years

Over my lifetime, I wrote many notable works such as:

  • The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County(1865)
  • Roughing It (1872)
  • The Guilded Age: A Tale of Today (1873)
  • Old Tales of the Mississippi (1875)
  • Life on the Mississippi (1883)
  • The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876)
  • The Prince and the Pauper (1882)
  • A Tramp Abroad  (1880)
  • Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885)
  • A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889)
  • Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894)
  • Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (1896)
1969 - 1971

Share Holder

Buffalo Express

I married Olivia Langdon, whom I fell in love with at first sight. She came from a wealthy but liberal family, and with her money I invested and made more money.

1961 - 1969

Roughing It

At the age of 26 I moved on from river life to the high desert valley in the silver mining town of Carson City, Nevada with my brother Orion, who had just been appointed Secretary of the Nevada Territory. I had never traveled past the frontier but I was excited to venture forth in stagecoach, which served as a basis for my semi-autobiographical novel Roughing It (1872). I tried my hand at mining on Jackass Hill in California in 1864, and also began reporting for numerous publications including the Territorial Enterprise, The Alta Californian, San Francisco Morning Call, Sacramento Union and The Galaxy. After being chased out of San Francisco by San Fran's finest, I traveled to various cities in America, met Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Charles Dickens in New York, and visited various countries in Europe, Hawaii, and the Holy Land which I based Innocents Abroad (1869) on. During this time, I also wrote “Advice For Little Girls” (1867) and “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calavaras County” (1867)

1959 - 1961

Steamboat Pilot

As a steamboat pilot, I knew the Mississippi River like the back of my hand! It took two years to get my license( see Steamboat Pilot University below). But my steamboat piloting career came to an unfortunate hault when the American Civil War broke out in 1861 and traffic along the Mississippi was curtailed.

1953 - 1957

Printer

After 14 years of living in Missouri, I traveled to New York City, Philedelphia, and St. Louis to work as a printer. There I did the same as I did for the Hannibal Journal and used what I learned during my apprenticeship.

1951 - 1953

Typesetter and Contributor

Hannibal Journal

I left my apprenticeship to become a typesetter and contributor or articles and humorous sketches for the Hannibal Journal, which was owned by my brother, Orion.

1949 - 1951

Printer's Apprentice

Ace's Top Job Printing

After the death of my father, I had to begin helping around the house to bring home some bacon. I took the first job that came knocking on my door of opportunity. I stayed for two years, and then moved on to bigger and better things.

Nov 1865 - Apr 1910

American Author/Journalist/Humorist

The Realist Literary Movement

Education

Education
1957 - 1959

Steamboat Pilot License

Steamboat Pilot University

On my voyage back to New Orleans, the steamboat pilot, Horace E. Bixby, inspired me to pursue a career as a steamboat pilot;  it was a richly rewarding occupation with wages set at $250 per month, roughly equivalent to $155,000 a year in 2009.  To get my steamboat pilot license, I needed a vast knowledge of the ever-changing Mississippi River to be able to stop at any of the hundreds of ports and wood-lots along the river banks. I meticulously studied 2,000 miles of the Mississippi for more than two years before receiving my steamboat pilot license in 1859.

1953 - 1957

School of Hard Knocks

During my travels between New York City, Philadelphia, and St. Louis, I would visit multiple libraries. Here, I educated myself in the evenings, finding wider sources of information than I would have at a conventional school.

Sep 1842 - Jun 1847

Masters

Funny Guy Elementary