Summary

Celia Brickman, author of Aboriginal Populations in the Mind: Race and Primitivity in Psychoanalysis, is a leader in the field of psychotherapy and religion. She demonstrates excellence in numerous professional roles related to psychotherapy and education. Currently serving as Director of Education at The Center for Religion & Psychotherapy of Chicago, Celia Brickman previously acted as Co-Director of Education for The Center for Religion & Psychotherapy of Chicago, from 2005 to 2010. She has been a member of the faculty and clinical staff at The Center for Religion & Psychotherapy of Chicago since 1994. Celia Brickman received her Bachelor of Arts from Vermont College of Norwich University (now known as the Vermont College of Fine Arts) in 1987 before matriculating at the University of Chicago Divinity School. There, Celia Brickman earned her Master of Arts in 1989 and her Doctor of Philosophy in 2000. She received numerous awards while attending, including the University of Chicago’s Susan Colver Rosenberger Educational Prize in 2001. Celia Brickman has taught in numerous institutions in the Chicago area, including DePaul University, where she taught a class on psychology and religion in 2000. Since 1991, Celia Brickman has served as Director of the Hyde Park Language Program. This program instructs graduate students from all disciplines and a variety of schools in reading French to increase their knowledge of the language or pass the University of Chicago graduate French examination. In addition to Aboriginal Populations in the Mind: Race and Primitivity in Psychoanalysis, Celia Brickman is the author of numerous significant articles, including “Psychoanalysis and Judaism in Context,” “The Persistence of the Past: Framing Symbolic Loss and Religious Studies in the Context of Race,” and an encyclopedia entry on Freud for the Encyclopedia of Global Religion and Society. Celia Brickman translated Marie-Claire Lavabre’s “Stalin’s Double Death: Memory and Meaning among French Communist Party Activists” from French for the 2000 book, Symbolic Loss: The Ambiguity of Mourning and Memory at Century’s End. She also translated Maurice Olender’s “The History of Religions and the Nostalgia for Origins: Concerning the Eliade-Pettazoni Correspondence,” for History of Religions in August 1997.

Work History

Work History
2006 - Present

Director of Education

Center for Religion & Psychotherapy of Chicago
1991 - Present

Director and French Instructor

Hyde Park Language Program

Education

Education
2000

Ph.D.

University of Chicago Divinity School