Amy Jenson

Amy Jenson

Skills

Skills

Public Affairs Reporting

This news reporting course emphasizes covering a beat and reporting skills. My beat is new technology. Public Affairs Reporting emphasis on public records, reporting, writing and editing. We also focus on responsibility and multicultural diversity, critical thinking and the need for accuracy, completeness and meeting deadlines. I learned to initiate story ideas, develop and verify information, write news stories in print, online and in broadcast formats. In this class I was required to write 14 stories. Eight from my beat (technology), deadline coverage of a meeting, advance and deadline coverage of a Stillwater City Council meeting, a school board meeting, deadline coverage of a court story, a group enterprise story and an individual enterprise story. 

Editing

I am currently in editing and I practice in editing for print, broadcast and Web, pictures and video. I am learning to perfect writing headlines, cutlines, blurbs, teases and promos. I take tests every week to better understand and remember the rules.

Reporting

I am a general reporter for the OSU newspaper; the O'Collegian. I write on almost anything happening in Stillwater or on campus. I have taken reporting where I had to go out and interview at least 3-5 people I did not know and write seven stories. The stories started with at least 500 words and progressing to a story of at least 1,500 words. At least one story had to be from a public meeting or speech with a deadline of midnight the day the event happens. Another had to be a feature on someone in the community. I am currently in Public Affairs Reporting, writing at least one story a week. I must write eight stories related to my beat, which is social media and technology, at least one sourced advance story for a Stillwater City Council meeting, deadline coverage of the meeting I attend, deadline coverage of a Stillwater School Board meeting and deadline coverage of a court hearing/trial due the day of coverage.

Electronic Communications

I took electronic communications and learned the basic skills for photography, videography, podcasting and Web page development. I created slide-shows and podcasts, learned how to edit video, and created Web pages using content created in class. 

AP Style Literate

I use AP style in everything I do with my classes and school newspaper. I took the language proficiency exam and passed with flying colors. I practice AP style every day. 

Video Production

I had to interview, shoot and edit video and create graphics to illustrate my message. I used visuals and narrative to tell my message. In lab we practiced production of “live-to-tape” video programs, with each student performing different production duties.  In lab I created an in studio commercial, a field commercial and a news package. I also made two commercials for the OSU Homecoming Parade. I went to Dainty Hooligan, a small boutique in Stillwater and interviewed the managers and shot footage of the store, clothes, shoes, accessories, etc. I took my information back to the studio and used Pro Tools and Final Cut Pro to edit, add music and upload. I did the same thing for the CVS Pharmacy commercial.        

Projects

Oklahoma State University hired a new chief wellness officer, a new position to the university and the second in the nation. (NEWS)

Suzy Harrington will help OSU in striving to become America’s healthiest campus, which is hard in a state where the percentages of people with diabetes, heart failure and obesity is one of the worst in the nation. (SCOPE)

“Health is the synergy of all of the dimensions of life: the spiritual, emotional, physical, social, and intellectual dimensions,” Harrington said.

Harrington said health is more about people living to the fullest of their potential.

She said if you are not stable in one aspect of your life it is hard to be balanced in all aspects of life. She said her job is to empower the students and faculty to be personally healthy in all of these dimensions.

Harrington, a registered nurse who holds a doctorate of nursing practice and a master of science in health services, said she looks at health as the sum of your life.

(IMPACT)

She said OSU offers opportunities, like intramurals and food programs for health and fitness at OSU; her goal is to pull them all together and have a cohesive group. (CONTEXT)

To accomplish weight loss students must eat healthy and exercise, but Julie Huber, a clinical instructor and the dietetic internship director at OSU and a registered dietician for 33 years, said she thinks a lot of OSU students are only accomplishing one.

“Eating a whole lot of food that’s good for you can be a bad thing,” Huber said.

Huber said college students overeat because of a lot of factors. Stress and anxiety can cause students to eat, especially foods that are bad for you, like trans fat. She said that restaurants serve such large portions, which give a false sense of what is appropriate to consume in one meal. Huber said portion size is the key to weight loss and control. (EDGE)

Huber said weight gain isn’t about how you look but about taking care of yourself so that you can stay healthy for your lifetime. Huber said she sees people who struggle with weight are sometimes not able to do things in life that they would like to do.

“It’s a quality of life issue when you are overweight, everything is a lot more effort and people are more tired and when you are at a healthy weight you can enjoy life more,” Huber said.

Oklahoma has one of the worst rates of obesity and regularly ranks in the top five most obese states. Harrington said OSU is trying to lead the health of the state by using the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, which is an extension of OSU that has a base in each county in Oklahoma to educate people. Harrington said the extensions could implement programs in each county to get across important health information.

“If we can compel each community around health and wellness by our extension programs, then we can change how people look at health,” Harrington said.

Harrington said her job is to work with all of the OSU campuses as well as the county extensions to implement programs to educate Oklahomans on the causes of weight gain and how to combat them.

She said a big part of having bad health has to do with the usage of tobacco. She said OSU is trying to combat this problem by recently becoming a tobacco-free campus.

Dina Cundith, executive director of the Downtown YMCA of Greater Tulsa, said developing evidence shows that family-based interventions can effectively change health and wellness behaviors of people who are battling obesity.

Because obesity is growing, there is a need to implement effective programs to improve the health behaviors of overweight people, Cundith said, who is also a certified dietician.

Cundith said concerns of being unhealthy are low self-esteem, poor body image, life-long health issues, bullying and shorter life spans. 

Corybeth Heien, a graphic design senior at Oklahoma State University, said without OSU she wouldn’t be in the best shape of her life.

“My biggest motivation to lose weight was the desire to never deal with depression again slinked with a desire to be just as athletic as all the other kids,” Heien said.

Heien said her weight loss journey didn’t start the way she expected. She was obsessive about her eating and she developed a disorder.

“I didn't work out I only watched my food,” Heien said. “I was convinced that one calorie over would undo everything I had done. However, since I lost weight, I was more confident in myself and I joined the swim team for my high school.” Once Heien started swimming, she said her food became necessary because she needed fuel to swim four hours a day, six times a week. Her new healthy habits helped her become stronger.

Heien lost 50 pounds in two years, but she wasn’t doing it the healthy way until college.

“Now that I'm in the sport of bodybuilding, losing weight to me is when it's time for a show,” Heien said. “Doing better than I did the last show is what motivates me. Bring in a tighter leaner package is what motivates me.” 

When Heien started lifting, she started at the Colvin Center. Heien says she now judges her body on what she looks like.

“I’ve been lifting for three years this month, and at 146 pounds now versus 135 pounds my freshman year I love my body more now than I ever have,” Heien said. “And I wear smaller clothes at 146 pounds than I did at 140 pounds two years ago.” 

It has been seven years since Heien resolved her disorders, an anniversary that she says will always be celebrated.

“When I dieted down for the 2013 OSU Classics, I dropped 20 pounds in 17 weeks,” Heien said. “I was healthy and eating more than most girls eat.” 

This process takes time, Heien says.

“In two weeks I will begin dieting again,” Heien said. “Until April 11th, I will work to lose 20 to 25 pounds, but it's more about what I look like not what the scale has to say.” She said without OSU she would have never gotten into bodybuilding.

“We are one heck of a lucky university,” Heien said. “We have a five-time world champion here at our university.

Heien said her journey started at OSU and the programs that the university has made her losing weight possible. Heien shows losing the weight is possible and OSU programs can help.

Harrington said she hopes students and faculty will use health and weight management programs offered to educate themselves then others on how to be healthy and the benefits of being and staying healthy. Harrington said these changes should work to make OSU America’s Healthiest campus.

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“We really want to empower our students and faculty to be personally healthy in all dimensions,” Harrington said.

Suzy Harrington, DNP, RN, MCHES- OSU Wellness Officer

405-744-4967 suzy.harrington@okstate.edu

Julie Huber, a clinical instructor, the dietetic internship director at OSU and a registered dietician

julie.huber@okstate.edu 405-744-695

Corybeth Heien, student, graphic design, Oklahoma State University

405-612-9935 corybeth.heien@okstate.edu

Dina Cundith, executive director of the Downtown YMCA of Greater Tulsa, dietician

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918-720-8732 dcundith@ymcatulsa.org

Work History

Work History

Assignment Editor

KJRH Channel 2

Reporter

Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

I work closely with the dean of the engineering department, as well as students and get information about changes and plans to make the engineering department even better. 

Education

Education
Jan 2010 - Present

Journalism

Oklahoma State University